Nancy

Nancy becomes increasingly convinced she was kidnapped as a child. When she meets a couple whose daughter went missing thirty years ago, reasonable doubts give way to willful belief.
[texting]
[message alert]
All right.
If you could get off
that for a minute,
I’d like to get up.
Ah.
[door opens]
The Internet’s out.
[Betty]
You’re addicted.
What’s a six-letter word
for bride-to-be?
Is it fiancé?
Fiancé. No, that’s five.
I don’t know why
you’re wasting your time.
You got to stop
opening my mail, Mom.
How many no’s
do you need to hear?
Would it kill you
to comb your hair?
Did the benefits
go through yet?
No. We got to wait
for the appeal.
How long is that
going to take?
-I don’t know.
-Huh?
I filled the forms out.
Well, did you do it
the right way,
like I showed you?
[cat meows]
Hi, Paul.
Did you hear what I said?
[phone rings]
-Hi.
-Hi, you’re from Unitemp?
Yeah.
[Deb] She was here a few days
last month. Remember?
What was your name again?
Nancy.
-Must be nice being a temp.
-[microwave buttons beeping]
You get to set
your own schedule.
I mean, it’s okay.
Where did you go
on vacation?
-The DPRK.
-Where’s that?
It’s the Democratic People’s
Republic of Korea.
Wait,
you went to North Korea?
[Deb] Oh, my friend just got
back from there.
She said it has
a really good shopping.
[Raj] Deb, that’s South Korea.
There’s no shopping
in North Korea.
There’s barely any food.
How the hell
did you get in exactly?
Oh, it’s, like,
really easy.
You can go as
an American tourist,
-you know,
through a tourist company.
-Really?
-[microwave beeps]
-Yeah, you should go.
It’s fascinating.
We had a lot of fun.
Actually, my wife’s Korean
and she doesn’t know anyone
that’s allowed in,
except for, like,
diplomats so…
Well, I have good photos
here from–
-Photos?
-Mm-hmm.
[Deb] Oh, that doesn’t
look that bad.
Yeah, that’s–
that’s me.
[Deb gasps]
You just went
by yourself or–
Yeah, but then they put me
in group.
-Who’s– who’s that?
-That’s like the,
like the leader
but, you know, it’s a statue.
-[gasps softly] Oh.
-Oh, wow. Sweet.
Where is that?
Uh… It’s just kind of,
like, a field.
What does that sign say?
I don’t know, it’s…
Korean.
[Nancy] Looks like
you’re feeling better.
What is this?
Just junk mail.
What are you up to?
-Nothing.
-[texting]
You can still have a baby
if you want to.
It’s not too late.
[typing]
[Jeb14 voice] Becca,
not a day goes by that
I don’t think of my daughter.

Even though she was
only on this earth for…

for a few hours.
I’ll… I’ll always cherish
those minutes forever.

[Nancy’s voice]
Thank you, Jeb14.

It really means a lot.
If it weren’t
for people like you,

I don’t know what I’d do.
[error message alert]
[alert chimes]
[message alert]
[metal clanking]
[Nancy] How’s the hand?
[Betty] Sore.
Sorry.
You know, if your hand’s
still hurting you tonight,
then we can go get it
checked out.
I think we should do it now.
Ma, can you not
open my mail?
-I want to do it right now.
-I think we should wait.
-Why, what are you doing now?
-Last time they said
it was just part
of your symptoms and–
Yeah, well…
-You should expect that.
-That’s easy for you to say.
I’m sick of
waiting around for you.
Always an excuse.
No, not today.
I don’t want this.
I don’t want it.
Get out of here.
Get these eggs
and get out of here.
[engine starts]
[doorbell jingles]
You Becca?
-Jeb.
-Yeah.
I thought it was you.
I just– I just didn’t
know what you really
looked like, you know.
Yeah.
Hey, thanks for coming
all the way out here.
That’s okay.
I had a light day today.
You ready to order?
We have a breakfast menu, too.
Uh, not for me, I’m just
going to have a cappuccino.
-Just a large coffee.
-Okay.
Yeah.
They say one cup a day
is fine,
and I’m pretty moderate.
That’s good.
Hey, uh, it probably
seems really weird that I’m–
it’s weird, because, I mean,
I could be a total creep
from the Internet
for all you know.
No, no,
I can tell you’re not.
Well, thank you.
So, um…
When are you due?
Oh, in a couple of months,
but the doctors are worried
it might be premature so–
You know what, I’m really glad
you decided to keep it.
Well, you helped me decide,
actually.
Really?
Mm-hmm.
You know, I think it’s so great,
that blog you write.
I mean, the way you write,
you have a gift,
you know that.
Thank you.
So, how did you find me,
anyways?
Well, after my daughter died
my wife, well,
my ex-wife now, just stopped
talking to me altogether.
She started thinking that, um,
we made a mistake
having the baby even,
because we were going
to lose it right away,
and so, after that
I started looking online
and looking at
all these websites.
[chuckles] Anyway, that’s…
that’s how I found you.
What was her name,
your daughter?
My daughter’s name
was Joey.
Sorry,
I just feel like I know you.
Me, too.
[crunching]
[door opens]
-[TV chatter]
-[door closes]
I brought you
some sushi.
I don’t eat raw fish.
You know that.
It has mercury in it.
Well, I’ll give it
to Paul, then.
Don’t give it to Paul.
It’ll make him sick.
Remember when Stan gave
him that raw tuna?
He threw up all day.
Nearly killed him.
Yeah, you pretty much let Stan
do whatever he wanted, huh?
[sighs]
[Nancy] What?
I can’t lift up my arm.
Well, it’s probably just
gone to sleep.
I don’t think so.
Oh. Ah.
Yeah, right there.
Yeah, yeah.
[brushing]
[cat meows]
Hey.
[spits]
[water running]
Mom?
Ma?
-[knocking on door]
-[door opens]
Ma?
Ma.
Miss Freeman.
I am so sorry.
Your mother had
a severe ischemic stroke.
It appears she passed away
in her sleep.
Her ongoing Parkinson’s
may have increased
the risk for a stroke
of this magnitude.
Miss Freeman?
[man] We have found that
it is very helpful
in the healing process
for her family or friends.
Have you thought about
what kind of a service
you would like?
[Nancy] Mrs. Griffiths? Hey.
It’s Nancy Freeman here,
Betty Freeman’s daughter.
Betty Freeman.
You used to go to church
with her.
She passed away.
It’s on Friday.
Oh, no, I understand.
[cell phone vibrates]
Becca?
Becca?
Hey.
Hey.
I thought it was you.
You look so different.
Yeah, I’m not
wearing any makeup.
You know, I’ve been
calling you all day.
Come on, you okay?
Yeah, I haven’t been
feeling so good.
I can’t talk actually.
Wha-what’s going on?
Come on, Becca, talk to me.
-Don’t do this.
-No, I can’t talk.
Come on,
don’t do this.
Stop following me.
Just… just tell me
what’s going on.
You know what–
just go away.
Come on,
just tell me–
Just go away.
Jesus Christ.
What the hell’s
going on?
What happened?
Are you okay?
I never had the baby.
It died.
What? What-what are you
talking about? When?
Before we met.
Be-before we met?
Why would–
why would you do
something like that?
Well, you said that I was
helping you and–
-You told me you named–
-I didn’t want to
let you down.
What, so you make up a lie
about a sick baby?
You make that shit up?
No, I just lied about when.
That’s all.
Hey.
Hey…
I really like you.
You’re sick.
Leave me alone.
[engine starts]
[cat meows]
[newsman on TV]
Here in Oswego, 30 years ago,

when Mr. and Mrs. Lynch’s
five-year-old daughter,
Brooke,

disappeared from
their local shopping mall
a week before Christmas.

The shocking case ripped
through the community

as neighbors and friends came
together to search for Brooke

in the weeks following
her disappearance.

She was never seen again.
Ten years ago,
her family started
a college scholarship fund

in remembrance
of their daughter.

We spoke to Mr. and Mrs. Lynch
on how they’re
honoring her today.

[woman] It’s like
it was just yesterday.

I can still
see her so clearly.

That year when
she was five is…

it’s frozen in time
in my memory.

[newsman] On the anniversary of
the last time the Lynch family

saw their daughter, they’re
hosting a fundraising gala.

We wanted her-her life
to count for something.

So, we decided to–
that the best way

to preserve
Brooke’s memory

was to help…
a child who might be
economically disadvantaged
to get to college.

Brooke would have
liked that.

Yeah, she was very smart.
She was so smart.

She was, she was
a really creative child.

She really loved learning
and this seemed like

the best
way to commemorate her.

[newsman] The National
Center for Missing and
Exploited Children

recently released
an age progression photo.

It’s what they believe
Brooke Lynch would look like
now at 35-years-old.

[TV chatter continues,
indistinct]
[printer whirring]
[cell phone dialing]
[ringing]
[phone ringing]
Hello?
Hello.
Hello?
Hi. Uh, can you hear me?
Yes. Who is this?
This is Nancy, um…
Who? I think you might have
the wrong number.

I know this is weird,
because, uh, you don’t know
who I am, but–
Look, if you’re selling
something, I’m not interested.
Thank you.
[sighs]
[phone ringing]
Yes?
I just,
I wanted to talk to you
about your daughter.
If you’re calling about
the scholarship fund,

you can visit the website.
No, it’s not–
it’s not about that.
Excuse me, who is this?
I think, I just, I think
that I have some information
about your daughter.
What the hell
are you talking about?
I just– I think that, um,
I think that I might be
your daughter, Brooke.
What kind of sick joke
is this? Who is this?
It’s not a joke.
My name is Nancy and –

Nancy Freeman was the name
that was my given name,
but I think that
my mother might’ve…
kidnapped me 30 years ago.
[breathing heavily]
[phone ringing]
Please, just stay on the line.
You need to explain.
I saw you on the TV
and, um,

I saw a photograph
of Brooke on the TV,
and, [sighs]
I can’t even explain it.
I just, it was like
looking in a mirror.
And we look really similar.
And there’s just
it would explain a lot of things
in my life, like,
I always felt like
my mom hated me.

How do I believe you?
I don’t know. I don’t know.
How do you know
your mother kidnapped you?

I don’t know. I mean,
I don’t have any proof.
There’s just a lot of little
things that add up.
I want to see
a photo of you… now.
Okay, I can send one
on my cell phone.

Okay, well,
let me give you
my cell phone. [clears throat]
It’s, um, 646-555-0127.
All right,
I’ll do it right now.
Okay. Bye.
[camera shutter clicks]
[cell phone ringing]
Hello?
As soon as I saw the photo –
I talked to Leo.
We both want to meet you
in person right away.

I can come now. I can come.
It’ll take me a few hours.
I come right away.
Leo’s in a lot of shock.
He-he thinks we should
talk to the police first.
I just really want to see
you right away.

Okay, well, call me
if you get lost.
-Okay.
-Okay.
-Bye.
-Okay.
[sniffles]
[cat meows]
Hurry up, Paul, we’re going.
She’s here.
[cat meows]
Hi.
-Hi.
-Hey, you must be Leo.
Thanks for coming so fast.
[Ellen] You must be tired
from your drive.
-[cat meows]
-[Leo] You have a cat.
Yeah, this is Paul.
-[cat meows]
-[chuckles]
Well, here, let me–
All right, come on in.
-Come on.
-Let’s go get warm.
Wow.
I didn’t know what else to do.
[chuckles]
Uh, can I take your coat?
Oh, yeah.
Um, I’m going to put your cat
right in the hallway here.
Oh, could we let him out?
Because he’s been
cooped up for hours.
Oh, uh,
Leo has a cat allergy.
You do?
I’ll tell you what.
How about if I put him –
I’ll let him out in the sunroom,
all right?
This way we can both breathe.
Is that okay?
Here, come on,
have a seat.
Yeah, that’s okay.
[Ellen]
Please, sit down.
Oh, please,
go ahead, take a seat.
[cat meows]
I’m sorry.
We’re just still
in a lot of shock.
We didn’t want to get
the police involved
because we wanted
to meet you first.
Is that okay
if we ask you some questions?
Yeah, of course, yeah.
I mean, how is it possible?
When did you realize
that you were… kidnapped?
Um…
Well…
You know, I’m still trying
to figure it out.
[Leo] Do you remember
being taken, anything?
Well, it’s just–
it’s all a bit fuzzy.
I remember holding your hand…
and then… losing you.
It was terrifying.
But later I just thought
it was like…
I lost my mom,
my other mom in the mall
for an hour
and that’s all
I can remember.
Well, it’s hard to remember
anything at that age.
[Ellen]
Leo is a psychologist.
Oh.
And what do you do?
I’m a professor,
comparative literature.
Yeah, that’s great.
So, when exactly
did you start to suspect
that your mother
kidnapped you?
Honey, maybe it’s a bit much
right away.
Take your time.
It’s okay.
Um, right before
she got sick, before she died.
Your mother died?
Your other mother?
Yeah.
And your father?
He left before I was born.
Anyways, um, a few years ago,
I got a job offer in India,
so when it came
time to find,
to get a passport, I couldn’t
find my birth certificate.
And when I asked her
where it was,
she would always say
it’s at my aunts’ house.
And, you know, it was lost.
Anyway, so,
I lost that job
and, uh, right after that
when I found out
that she had Parkinson’s and…
and that’s when she told me
that she wasn’t
my biological mother.
Okay.
I never felt, like,
a connection to my mom.
Excuse me, can I go
to the bathroom?
Of course. It’s just there,
right on your right.
[mumbles, indistinct]
[door closes]
[coughs]
[toilet flushes]
[knocks]
Everything okay?
Nancy?
[Nancy] Yeah,
everything’s okay.
Nancy,
just to get things going,
I’ve arranged for a private
investigator to come tomorrow.
He’ll do a DNA test
and, uh, ask some questions,
-and, in the meantime–
-Leo.
I think the sooner the better
for all of us.
Um, you know, I think
that I should probably
get going anyway,
because I don’t want to intrude
or anything.
-[Ellen] Oh, please, stay.
-No, it’s all right.
Please, you know,
you should stay the night.
It’s too long of a drive,
and we have an extra room.
Well, could…
could Paul come in?
You mean in the house?
Just this once?
Let me think about it.
[Ellen] Nancy, come on.
Let me show you that extra room.
-Come on.
-Okay.
[Ellen] Okay.
Or you could sleep
on the pullout sofa
if you’d rather.
No, it’s okay.
Okay.
Leo always wanted me
to get rid of all of her stuff,
your stuff.
We keep this room locked
when we have guests.
Um, there’s towels here.
Thanks.
I could sleep in here, too,
if you want.
-Okay.
-Okay.
[Ellen] I used to
lie in here for hours.

I convinced myself
you were living with
some nice family somewhere.
I’d imagine how long
your hair was,
what your clothes were like,
who your friends were.
I hope you’re not disappointed.
Why would you say that?
How did you sleep?
I slept really well,
thank you.
I thought you were
going to come in.
-I thought you were–
-Yeah, I meant to.
I guess I just fell really
deeply asleep for a change.
I’m sorry.
You don’t have to be sorry.
I’m just–
No, I–
I know you’re worried.
I know you’re worried.
-[cat meows]
-Sorry, Paul.
-Hey.
-[Leo] …want it to be her.
I mean,
I understand that.
You know,
I want it to be her, too, but–
-[Ellen] Do you?
-[cat meows]
What?
[Leo] It looks good.
[Ellen] Oh, it’s okay.
Leo, why don’t you show Nancy
your photo studio?
Sure.
[clears throat]
They should be
in a gallery or something.
[Leo] No.
I mean, it’s really
just a hobby.
I’m not that good.
I got my first camera
when Brooke was born.
You know, I have some
old photos, I think, in here.
Four years old.
Look-look really happy.
I used to look at these all
the time so I wouldn’t forget.
Ah, do you remember the lake?
You used to–
well, I would take
Brooke there every day
in the summer.
Well, keep looking.
Maybe something
will jog your memory.
Do you mind
if I take your photo?
Um…
Oh, okay.
Yeah?
All right, just look at me.
Just move the chair a
little bit towards the window.
Good, good.
[camera shutter clicks]
Look at me
a little bit more.
I’m not very photogenic.
Sure, you are.
That’s nice, just relax.
Look at me.
I’m not–
[camera shutter clicks]
-More?
-No, no, I’m good. Thanks.
-Nancy?
-[knock on door]
[Leo] Must be the PI.
-[man] Mr. Lynch?
-Yes.
-Hi. I’m Jake from ICP.
-Hi, come on in.
So, I’m just going to ask you
a few questions
and then I’m going to take
a sample of everyone’s saliva
to make sure that you are
Brooke Lynch.
Otherwise, the police
can’t reopen the case. Okay?
So, your–
your name is Nancy Freeman?
-Yeah.
-Okay.
And, um, your mother,
the one who raised you,
her name?
Betty Freeman.
Now, Mr. Lynch mentioned that
she is now deceased, correct?
-Yes.
-Okay, when did she pass?
Um…
about a week ago.
What?
Well, she, I mean, she was sick
for a really long time,
then she– she had a stroke
and died.
[Jake] And your–
your mother, Betty,
did she ever confess
to a kidnapping
or anything like that?
Well, she said that
she’d adopted me
from her distant cousin.
Distant cousin?
Did you ever meet this cousin?
Do you know his name?
No.
-I need a copy of your
driver’s license, please, Nancy.
-Yeah.
[Jake] Take a quick picture.
-Let’s see here.
-[camera shutter clicks]
-Beautiful. Thank you.
-[Nancy] Thanks.
All right, so I’m going to
take those saliva samples now.
Okay. Who wants to go first?
Mr. Lynch?
All right. Just open your mouth
a little for me.
There we go.
That easy. Okay.
Okay, Mrs. Lynch.
Beautiful.
All right,
and last
but not least.
Open up.
The results should be ready
in about two or three
business days.
Is there any way
to expedite it?
[Jake] I’m sorry, that’s the
fastest the lab can process it.
It’s already been expedited
given the extreme nature
of this case.
I see.
-[Leo] Thank you for coming.
-[Jake] Of course.
Oh, and, uh,
if you have any questions,
here, let me give you my card.
There you go.
Feel free to
reach out anytime. Okay?
-Thank you.
-[Jake] Okay.
Take care.
[Leo] Thank you.
Maybe we should
do something.
Thanks.
I’ll get us a catalog.
You know, she’s been waiting for
Brooke for a really long time.
What about you?
Well, of course, but I-I just
don’t want to see her get hurt.
A girl was found 20 years ago,
ended up being a false alarm.
[whispers] Ellen,
I don’t think
that Leo likes me.
[softly] Why would you say that?
He just has a hard shell,
that’s all.
Do you remember when
we first moved in here and
she stepped on a nail?
Oh, God,
that was terrifying.
We were renovating and
you stepped right on a nail.
We had to rush you
to the hospital.
I wonder if she still
has a scar.
It’s probably gone by now.
[Leo] Well,
she did get stitches.
What, I still have scars
from when I was little.
She doesn’t have to
show us.
Well, which foot was on?
Do you remember?
No.
It was your left.
Let me have look.
Oh, yeah,
is that it?
Uh, I don’t think so.
You know what, maybe it was
your other foot.
[Nancy] We can have a look
at my right foot.
Shirley Jackson.
Yeah, I teach her work
in my class.
You do?
She’s one of
my favorite authors.
This is you?
You wrote this?
Yeah, that was my thesis
in grad school.
Wow.
Mm. Not really.
[chuckles]
I haven’t published
anything since.
Why not?
I-I tried to write about
your disappearing.
First, it was a memoir.
Then, it was fiction.
See those?
Those are all
the unfinished versions.
Can I read one of them?
Well, they’re kind of a mess.
No one has ever seen them.
Do you think you could read
one of my stories?
I didn’t know you wrote.
They’re not that good
or anything.
I bet that’s not true.
Well, I mean, I’m not like
a professional like you are.
I bet there’s a reason
you became a writer.
I’d like to read
one of your stories.
Could I?
Yeah, okay,
I can email you something.
[Ellen] Leo, these records
are so random.
-[chuckles]
-[Leo] They’re what?
They’re so random.
How did we end up with this?
I took all those records
back about five years ago
to the flea market
and then, somehow,
they ended up back in the house.
[Ellen] Yeah,
I went and rebought them
without realizing,
and yet I don’t know how
he had them to begin with.
[chuckles] You know?
Would you like anymore wine?
Uh… No, I’m fine.
Oh, um, Leo,
Nancy sent me– uh,
emailed me a story she wrote.
Can we print it out
and read it?
Oh, right now?
Yeah, come on, please.
Um, yeah.
[Ellen] Can’t wait.
[printer whirring]
-Slow, slow, quick, quick,
-[music playing]
-slow, slow.
-Hang on,
-you’re, like,
going backwards.
-Yeah, that’s right.
-Slow, slow, quick, quick, slow.
-[laughing]
Slow, slow, quick.
-I’m not very good.
-No, I’m not either.
I don’t know what I’m doing.
[laughing]
You want to help me
with this? Come here.
Sure.
-You show us.
-I don’t know.
[laughing]
You have a way with writing.
Reminds me of Joan Didion,
right?
-Yeah.
-I feel like, um,
Play It As It Lays
or Run River maybe.
Didn’t read that one,
but yeah.
Have you ever tried
to get anything published?
Yeah, everywhere.
Well, you can’t just give up.
I know a couple of editors
in New York I could send it to.
Really?
You don’t have to.
Well, I think
you really have talent.
Of course, I might be
a little biased.
-Hey.
-Hi.
[Ellen] I found this.
[chuckles]
I used to play that for you
every night at bedtime.
Yeah?
[chiming]
Thanks.
Did you mean what you said?
About what?
About having talent?
Of course, I did.
I wouldn’t lie about that.
But, like, how do you know?
I don’t know.
I mean, you really bring
the reader into your world.
Even though it’s
a different world.
Your writing is-is raw.
I mean, there’s grammatical
errors but you really know
how to tell a story.
You have writing at school?
No. I had a few semesters
at community college but…
I always had to
look after ma and,
you know,
we didn’t have any money.
You really don’t know
anything about your father?
Hmm-mm.
I remember ma used to
have a lot of boyfriends
and she would sometimes
ask them to read to me
at bedtime.
And… the drunk ones would,
like, fall asleep in my bedroom.
I’m so sorry…
I wasn’t there.
[cat meows]
Paul.
[softly] Paul!
[shouting] Paul!
Paul!
[softly] Paul, come here.
Paul.
[shouting] Paul!
Paul!
Nancy?
What are you doing?
Paul’s run away.
Nancy, it’s freezing out here.
Come inside.
-Paul’s run away!
-We’ll look for him
in the morning.
We can’t look
for him in the morning.
He’s a house cat.
Um, Nancy, it’s 4 AM.
Come inside.
We’ll put some food out.
He’ll come back.
What do you–
what do you know about cats?
I grew up with cats.
They always come back.
Come inside.
Try to go back to sleep.
We’ll find him in the morning.
-I’m sorry.
-[door opens]
Paul?
Paul?
Paul?
Nancy?
Paul?
Paul?
Paul?
[crying] Nancy?
Nancy?
Nancy?
Nancy?
Nancy, where were you?
I was looking for Paul.
You shouldn’t be out
in the woods without
your proper colors.
It’s hunting season.
Let’s go inside.
He’ll come back.
Trust me.
Did there used to be
a tree house out back?
Yeah.
How did you know?
Well, when I was out there
I remember… playing in it.
I built it for you.
[chuckles softly]
[cat meows]
Paul!
Hey, he’s back.
Paul. Hey.
Paul.
You were right.
Paul, you’re so cold.
-[meows]
-I’m going to get you home.
What, you’re leaving now?
[Nancy] Yeah, well,
I should get him home,
and you guys
have been so generous.
No, please, please stay.
Maybe we could take a walk.
We could show her the lake.
You’re welcome to stay.
-Okay.
-Sorry.
[sneezes]
I can– I can put him, uh,
in his carrier if you’d like.
No, you know what,
why don’t you
put him in your room.
Just keep the door shut.
Yeah?
[chuckles] All right.
[Leo] Why don’t you two go.
I’m just going to stay here
and clean up.
Thank you, sweetie.
[phone ringing]
-[phone beeps on]
-[Ellen] Hello?
Oh, Mr. Zandia. Hi.
You have the results already?
Oh.
Are you– are you sure?
Okay.
Thank, oh, thank you.
Goodbye.
[phone beeps off]
[sobbing]
[footsteps approaching]
We used to come here a lot
when Brooke was little.
She loved the water.
The day that Brooke
went missing,
do you know why
she let go of my hand?
She saw a kitten
in the pet store.
She had wanted one
for Christmas.
As soon as she saw it
she ran right off.
[crying] She just slipped
right out of my hand.
When I got to the pet store
I couldn’t find her,
and I looked all over the mall.
And I kept going back
and back to the pet store.
She was gone.
It wasn’t your fault.
[distant gunshot]
It’s the hunters.
We should get going.
[man] Hey, stop!
I-I need your phone.
We need–
We-we need–
we need an ambulance.
-[mumbling]
-I’ll do it. I’ll do it.
Yes, hello, uh,
we have an emergency.
Um, take us to it.
Uh, near, I think
near Birder’s Point.
Um, yes, I think it was
a hunting accident.
What happened?
[man] We were hunting and
then there was an accident.
-What’s his name?
-Ben.
Hey, Ben, hey.
Keep looking at me.
It’s going to be all right.
Hang in there.
[man] Hey, I need you to
keep your eyes open, okay?
-Ben, can you please–
-Hey, hey, hey. Hi.
Just keep him awake.
Stay awake.
Stay awake.
[man] You need to keep your
eyes open, okay.
-All right?
-[distant sirens]
You’re not going to tell mom
and dad about this, right?
Hey.
-They’re coming.
-[grunts faintly]
[Ellen] Maybe 18 or 19.
[Leo] No other adults around
or parents?
No, I didn’t see them. No.
It was awful.
But Nancy was terrific.
She-she seemed to know
just what to do.
-She helped stop the bleeding.
-Really?
Yeah.
[Leo]
Well, I hope he’s okay.
[Nancy]
Yeah, we don’t know.
People get taken from you
just like that.
We have to appreciate
what we have now.
It’s the only thing that’s real.
Shall we have dessert?
[Leo] Oh, I’m full.
What is it?
Apple crisp.
-You’re killing me.
-[Ellen chuckles]
-Yeah.
-Nancy?
It’s getting pretty late.
I think, um,
I’m just
gonna go to bed.
But it’s so early.
Yeah, I’m just,
I’m really tired.
I’m really,
really exhausted.
I love you.
No matter what.
I need to
tell you guys something.
There are things
that you don’t know,
that I haven’t told you.
And, um…
And I want to tell you.
I know I’m–
I know you’ve been
through a lot.
It’s in your past.
We’re here for you now.
We’ll get through it.
Why don’t you go
get some sleep?
We’ll talk about it tomorrow.
Okay.
[purring]
[door creaks]
[car engine starts]
[soft piano music plays]
[soft rock music plays]